Medavia Ops

Our Fleet

The fleet today consists of two Beechcraft 1900D, one Dash 8 100 and one Dash 8’s 300.

Medavia operates 2 Beechcraft 1900D. These aircraft are significantly fast and quiet, and as they have a pressurized cabin they are also capable of cruising at 25,000 feet. Due to these characteristics the Beechcraft 1900D is extremely suitable for operations to prepared airstrips and affords improved passenger comfort and higher speeds. With a passenger configuration consists of 18 single seats, the Beechcraft 1900D is one of the most popular aircraft in this category.

In September 2005 the Company purchased its first Dash 8 100 series aircraft which was introduced into service in February 2006. This aircraft was so successful that the Company immediately started considering purchasing another Dash 8 300 series.  Medavia took delivery of its first Dash 8 300 series which was introduced into commercial service in May 2007. Once again, due to the success and increased demand another Dash 8 300 series was aquired and started operating in April 2008.  The Dash 8 aircraft gave Medavia a cutting edge in the industry through their additional passenger comfort.

Dash 8 100 Series

Country of origin

Canada

Powerplants

The original engine was the PW120A (CAA validated on December 13, 1985); later units used the PW121 (CAA validated on February 22, 1990). Rated engine power is 1,800 shp (1,340 kW).

Performance

100A – Max cruising speed 490km/h (265kt), long range cruising speed 440km/h (237kt). Initial rate of climb 1560ft/min. Range with full passenger load, fuel and reserves 1520km (820nm), range with a 2720kg (6000lb) payload 2040km (1100nm). 100B – Same except max cruising speed of 500km/h (270kt). 200A & 200B – Same except max cruising speed 546km/h (295kt). Initial rate of climb 1475ft/min. Range with 37 passengers 1795km (970nm).

Type

Turboprop regional airliner

History

Bombardier’s de Havilland Dash 8 has proven to be a popular player in the regional turboprop airliner market.

De Havilland Canada began development of the Dash 8 in the late 1970s in response to what it saw as a considerable market demand for a new generation 30 to 40 seat commuter airliner. The first flight of the first of two preproduction aircraft was on June 20 1983, while Canadian certification was awarded on September 28 1984. The first customer delivery was to norOntair of Canada on October 23 1984.

Like the Dash 7, the Dash 8 features a high mounted wing and Ttail, and has an advanced flight control system and large full length trailing edge flaps. Power meanwhile is supplied by two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW120 series (originally designated PT7A) turboprops.

Initial Dash 8 production was of the Series 100, which was followed by the Series 100A in 1990. The 100A introduced a revised interior with extra headroom and PW120A turboprops. The Series 100B was offered from 1992 with more powerful PW121s for better climb and airfield performance.

Production since switched to the improved performance Dash 8-200. Announced in 1992 and delivered from April 1995 the -200 features more powerful PW123C engines which give a 56km/h (30kt) increase in cruising speed, as well as greater commonality with the stretched Dash 8300. The 200B derivative has PW123Bs for better hot and high performance.

From the second quarter of 1996 all Dash 8s delivered have been fitted with a computer controlled noise and vibration suppression system (or NVS). To reflect this the designation was changed to Dash 8Q (Q for `quiet’). In 1998 that was changed again to Dash 8 Q200 when a new interior was introduced.

Weights

100A – Operating empty 10,250kg (22,600lb), max takeoff 15,650kg (34,500lb). 100B – Operating empty 10,273kg (22,648lb), max takeoff 16,465kg (36,300lb). 200A & 200B – Operating empty 10,434kg (23,004lb), max takeoff 16,465kg (36,300lb).

Dimensions

Wing span 25.91m (85ft 0in), length 22.25m (73ft 0in), height 7.49m (24ft 7in). Wing area 54.4m2 (585.0sq ft).

Capacity

Flightcrew of two. Typical passenger seating for 37 at four abreast and 79cm (31in) pitch, max seating for 40.

Production

347 Dash 8-100s/-200s in service or on order at late 1998. The Dash 8–100 is no longer in production, with the last Dash 8–102 built in 2005.

Dash 8 300 Series

Country of origin

Canada

Powerplants

Turboprops driving four blade Hamilton Standard propellers. 300B – Two 1865kW (2500shp) PW123Es.

Performance

300 – Max cruising speed 532km/h (287kt). Initial rate of climb 1800ft/min. Service ceiling 25,000ft. Range with full passenger load and reserves 1538km (830nm), with 2720kg (6000lb) payload 1612km (870nm). 300B – Max cruising speed 528km/h (285kt). Range with 50 passengers 1625km (878nm), with 50 passengers and auxiliary fuel 2275km (1228nm).

Type

Turboprop regional airliner

History

With the success of the Dash 8-100 series, a stretched version with greater capacity was a logical development.

De Havilland Canada (now part of Bombardier) launched full scale development of a 50 seat stretched version of its Dash 8 regional airliner during 1986, approximately two years after the standard fuselage length aircraft had entered service. The first series 300 aircraft was in fact the prototype Dash 8 converted to the new length, and it flew for the first time in its new configuration on May 15 1987. Flight testing culminated in the awarding of Canadian certification in February 1989, with the first delivery to Time Air following late that same month. US certification was awarded in June 1989.

The stretch comprises fuselage plugs forward and aft of the wing, increasing length by 3.43m (11ft 3in). In addition, the wings are greater in span. The fuselage stretch increases typical seating capacity to 50 (at 81cm/32in pitch), or for up to 56 (at 74cm/29in pitch). Other changes compared with the Dash 8-100 were minor, but included a larger, repositioned galley, larger toilet, additional wardrobe, dual air conditioning packs, a new galley service door and optional APU.

The Dash 8-300 has been offered in a number of variants. The standard 300 was followed in 1990 by the 300A which introduced optional higher gross weights, interior improvements (as on the Dash 8-100A), and standard PW123A engines (with PW123Bs optional). The 300B was introduced in 1992 and has 1865kW (2500shp) PW123Bs as standard, as is the optional high gross weight of the 300A. The 300E has 1775kW (2380shp) PW123Es rated to 40 degrees, thus improving hot and high performance.

Like the Dash 8Q-200, all Dash 8-300s built since the second quarter of 1996 have been fitted with a computer controlled noise and vibration suppression system (or NVS) and so from then all models were designated Dash 8Q-300s. In 1998 the aircraft was again renamed, this time to Dash 8-Q300 when a new interior was also introduced.

Weights

300 – Operating empty 11,657kg (25,700lb), standard max takeoff 18,642kg (41,100lb). 300B – Operating empty 11,719kg (25,836lb), max takeoff 19,505kg (43,000lb).

Dimensions

Wing span 27.43m (90ft 0in), length 25.68m (84ft 3in), height 7.49m (24ft 7in). Wing area 56.2m2 (605sq ft).

Capacity

Flightcrew of two. Standard single class seating for 50 passengers at four abreast and 81cm (32in) pitch.

Production

Total orders for Dash 8-300s stood at over 136 by late 1998, of which 128 were in service. The Dash 8-300 is no longer in production. Production of the Q200 and Q300 ceased in May 2009.

Beech 1900D

Country of origin

United States of America

Powerplants

1900D – Two 955kW (1280shp) P&WC PT6A67D turboprops.

Performance

1900D – Max cruising speed 533km/h (288kt). Range with 10 pax and reserves at long range cruising speed 2776km (1498nm).

Type

Regional airliner and corporate transport

History

The Beech 1900 19 seat commuter was chosen along with the smaller 1300, both developments of the King Air 200, and the C99 for Beech’s reentry into the regional airliner market in 1979.

The most obvious change from the King Air 200 to the 1900C is the substantially lengthened fuselage (17.63m/57ft 10in compared to 13.34m/43ft 9in). Other changes include more powerful engines, a modified tail with tailets, and stabilons on the lower rear fuselage.

Development of the 1900 commenced in 1979, with first flight occurring on September 3 1982. US FAA certification was awarded in November 1983, prior to the 1900C’s entry into service in February the following year. The first ExecLiner corporate transport version was delivered in mid 1985.

During the course of 1900C production a wet wing was introduced increasing fuel capacity by 927 litres (204Imp gal/245US gal), while military transport, maritime patrol and electronic surveillance versions were offered.

Beech announced the improved 1900D at the US Regional Airlines Association meeting in 1989, with the prototype, a converted 1900C, first flying on March 1 1990. Production switched to the improved model in 1991, with first deliveries (to Mesa Air) that November. The main change introduced on the 1900D was the substantially deeper fuselage with standup headroom. In addition it also introduced larger passenger and freight doors and windows, twin ventral strakes and auxiliary horizontal fixed tails, while more powerful engines and winglets improve hot and high performance.

The 1900D has sold particularly well. For example the 1900D’s biggest customer is Mesa Airlines, a United Airlines feeder, which has placed total firm orders for 118. A 1900D delivered to Impulse Airlines in Australia in March 1997 was the 500th 1900 built.

Weights

1900D – Typical empty 4831kg (10,650lb), max takeoff 7688kg (17,120lb).

Dimensions

1900D – Wing span (over winglets) 17.67m (58ft 0in), length 17.63m (57ft 10in), height 4.72m (15ft 6in). Wing area 28.8m2 (310.0sq ft).

Capacity

Flightcrew of two. Standard passenger accommodation for 19 at two abreast. ExecLiner configurations range for between 10 to 18, depending on customer requirements.

Production

More than 300 1900Ds had been ordered at the time of writing.

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